H. G. Wells Red Plaque Photo

H. G. Wells red plaque - Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) H. G. Wells, the writer, lived in this district for several years. Between 1893 and 1894 he lived here and later, on his return from London, moved to 'The Avenue' in Worcester Park. In his novel 'Ann Veronica' (1909), Worcester Park appears as 'Morningside Park'.

H. G. Wells Red Plaque Map


Other Blue Plaques in LondonView All Blue Plaques

W. T. Stead Green Plaque - W. T. Stead 1849-1912 journalist and reformer of great renown lived here 1904-1912
Brass Plaque № 11595 - St Peter's Italian Church - 1863. In 1845 St. Vincent Pallotti a R.C. priest and founder of the S.A.C. (Pallottine Fathers) thought of constructing a church in London for Italian immigrants. The Irish architect, Sir John Miller-Bryson modelled the church on the Basilica of San Crisogono in Trastevere - Rome.  It was to hold 3,400 people but was scaled down, at that time it was the only church in Britain in the Roman basilican style. It was consecrated on the 16th April 1863, as the "Church of St
Charles Holden Brown Plaque - Heritage Information  Cockfosters station  Listed as a building of National Significance  Architect: Charles Holden, 1933  The station opened in the then small hamlet of Cockfosters on 31 July 1933, the last of the stations on the extension of the line from Finsbury Park.  The station was to be a focal point for a new suburb and although some development took place, areas to the north and east of the station became part of the protected London Green Belt.  The station building is a low European